vaccine

Awarded Project: "NIAID Centers of Excellence for Influenza Research and Surveillance"

January 01, 2019
NIAID Centers of Excellence for Influenza Research and Surveillance

Dr. Christopher J. Miller, in conjunction with the St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, received a two year contract from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH.  Seasonal influenza A virus (IAV) infections kill up to 49,000 people in the United States each year. Pandemics can kill many more people, and considerable scientific effort is directed to addressing pandemics prophylactically because responses after a pandemic are too late.

Article: "Optimal protection against Salmonella infection requires noncirculating memory"

October 17, 2018
Breakthrough in Designing a Better Salmonella Vaccine

UC Davis researchers announce in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences this week a breakthrough in understanding which cells afford optimal protection against Salmonella infection—a critical step in developing a more effective and safe vaccine against a bacterium that annually kills an estimated one million people worldwide.

Awarded Project: “Target antigen identification to improve Salmonella vaccination”

May 31, 2018
Dr. Stephen McSorley receives 5-year grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)

Stephen McSorley recently received a five year grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) to study “Target antigen identification to improve Salmonella vaccination” (R01AI139410).  Systemic Salmonella infections cause 1 million deaths every year and there is an urgent need for a sub-unit vaccine that could be administered to infants and other vulnerable individuals.

Awarded Project: "CMV-vectored vaccine approaches to induce protective antibodies to HIV-1 Env"

May 14, 2018
CMV-vectored Vaccine Approaches to Induce Protective Antibodies to HIV-1 Env

Dr. Peter Barry recently received a two year grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) to study “CMV-vectored vaccine approaches to induce protective antibodies to HIV-1 Env” (R21AI134618).  This proposal is an exploratory investigation into approaches that will (1) promote antibody responses to rhesus cytomegalovirus (RhCMV)-vectored SIV vaccines in the face of pre-existing RhCMV immunity, and (2) increase SIV antigen expression.

Awarded Project: "CD4 T cell responses to Chlamydia infection"

March 01, 2016
CD4 T cell responses to Chlamydia infection

Dr. Stephen J. McSorley received a four year grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH.  The CDC estimates that Chlamydia is one of the most prevalent bacterial infections in the US and causes upper reproductive tract pathology in a growing number of otherwise health young  women. Unfortunately, women with untreated Chlamydia infection can develop serious pelvic  inflammatory disease (PID), infertility, chronic pelvic pain, or suffer from ectopic pregnancy.

Awarded Project: "How did a vaccine enhance HIV acquisition "

June 15, 2015
How did a vaccine enhance HIV acquisition

Dr. Christopher J. Miller was awarded a five year grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH.  In the STEP trial of an Ad5 vectored HIV vaccine, more people receiving the vaccine than the placebo became HIV-infected. The proposed studies will determine how this occurred. We will use a monkey model of AIDS for these studies where increased virus acquisition in animals getting the same vaccine has been shown.

Awarded Project: "Role of IRF4 in T Helper Cell Fate Decisions"

December 01, 2014
Role of IRF4 in T Helper Cell Fate Decisions 

Dr. Roger Sciammas received a five year grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH.  Vaccines are powerful tools of preventative medicine which have re-defined the quality of public health; however, in addition to targeting key antigens, how vaccines could be modified to guide the immune response is still not clear.