salmonella

Awarded Project: "Salmonella-specific Th1 cell function and residence"

January 10, 2019
Salmonella-specific Th1 cell function and residence

Dr. Stephen J. McSorley was awarded a five year grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH.  Systemic Salmonella infections are responsible for almost 1 million deaths annually and there is an urgent need to understand the mechanisms of protective immunity. Host CD4 T cells responses are critical for protective immunity to Salmonella in humans and in mouse models but there is a knowledge gap in relation to the functional requirements for memory CD4 T cells during a protective response.

Article: "Optimal protection against Salmonella infection requires noncirculating memory"

October 17, 2018
Breakthrough in Designing a Better Salmonella Vaccine

UC Davis researchers announce in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences this week a breakthrough in understanding which cells afford optimal protection against Salmonella infection—a critical step in developing a more effective and safe vaccine against a bacterium that annually kills an estimated one million people worldwide.

Awarded Project: “Target antigen identification to improve Salmonella vaccination”

May 31, 2018
Dr. Stephen McSorley receives 5-year grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)

Stephen McSorley recently received a five year grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) to study “Target antigen identification to improve Salmonella vaccination” (R01AI139410).  Systemic Salmonella infections cause 1 million deaths every year and there is an urgent need for a sub-unit vaccine that could be administered to infants and other vulnerable individuals.