HIV

Awarded Project: "Role of female genital mucosa associated CD4 T cells in vaccine-induced HIV susceptibility"

December 05, 2018
Role of female genital mucosa associated CD4 T cells in vaccine-induced HIV susceptibility

Dr. Smita Iyer received a two year award.  The majority of HIV infections by heterosexual transmission occur in women; understanding factors contributing to this increased risk is critical to prevent HIV infection in women and curb the global HIV/AIDS pandemic. This proposal uses robust complementary approaches and cutting-edge immunological tools to address this concern. Accomplishment of proposed goals will aid in designing interventions in women to prevent HIV infection.

 

Awarded Project: "Immune Mechanisms Underlying Age-Related Neurodegeneration in HIV Infection"

September 30, 2018
Immune Mechanisms Underlying Age-Related Neurodegeneration in HIV Infection

Dr. Smita Iyer received a fiver year grant from the National Institute on Aging, NIH to study age-related neurodegeneration related to HIV infection.  An estimated 50% of HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy develop neurocognitive disorders. This proposal uses robust powerful and complementary approaches to understand the immune mechanisms underlying age- related neurodegeneration during HIV infection.

Awarded Project: "Estrogen reverses progestin-mediated increases in susceptibility to genital virus pathogens"

September 01, 2018
Estrogen reverses progestin-mediated increases in susceptibility to genital virus pathogens 

Dr. Christopher J. Miller, in conjunction with Stanford University, received a five year grant from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development, NIH.  Prior work from our research group revealed that while depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) and other progestins used for contraception compromise genital mucosal barrier function, treatment of humanized mice with DMPA and estrogen (E) restores barrier integrity and blocks genital HIV transmission.

Article: "Prevention of HIV-1 transmission by CD4-mimetic small-molecule entry inhibitors"

July 01, 2018
Prevention of HIV-1 transmission by CD4-mimetic small-molecule entry inhibitors

Dr. Christopher J. Miller, in conjunction with the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Inc., received a four year grant from the National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH.  The global AIDS pandemic is sustained by continued sexual transmission of the etiologic agent, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1).

Awarded Project: "Role of vaginal microbiome and metabolome in HIV vaccine efficacy "

February 07, 2018
Role of vaginal microbiome and metabolome in HIV vaccine efficacy

Dr. Smita Iyer was awarded a two year grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH.  A complete understanding of biological factors influencing vaccine efficacy is necessary to advance the development of an effective HIV vaccine. This proposal integrates robust cutting-edge approaches to understand these factors in the context of a funded pre-clinical study focused on enhancing HIV vaccine immunogenicity.

Awarded Project: "Targeting HIV Lung Reservoir in the Macaque Model"

August 01, 2016
Targeting HIV Lung Reservoir in the Macaque Model

Dr. Marcelo Kuroda was awarded a three year grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH.  The goal of this study is to use an animal model of AIDS disease to determine specifically the cell(s) and/or tissues(s) that act as viral reservoirs so that these cells can be removed to cure.

 

 

Awarded Project: "How did a vaccine enhance HIV acquisition "

June 15, 2015
How did a vaccine enhance HIV acquisition

Dr. Christopher J. Miller was awarded a five year grant from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH.  In the STEP trial of an Ad5 vectored HIV vaccine, more people receiving the vaccine than the placebo became HIV-infected. The proposed studies will determine how this occurred. We will use a monkey model of AIDS for these studies where increased virus acquisition in animals getting the same vaccine has been shown.